It’s not Monday, it’s Yorkshire Day, yer daft ‘apeth!

Don’t worry, “daft ‘apeth” (silly person) is just a term of endearment here in God’s Own Country (that’s Yorkshire). Every year, on the 1st August, we celebrate Yorkshire Day – a day dedicated to all things that make the biggest county in England great.

Dakin-Flathers is Yorkshire born and bred, 125 years ago, and based in fabulous Featherstone, West Yorkshire – just down t’road from Sheffield, centre of the well known steel universe. Apart from our world famous blades, summat (something) that recently put Yorkshire on the world map was the Tour de France Grand Depart where our stunning rolling dales, stunning coastline, hospitality and passion for life were on show to the world. It was a reet (right) do (occasion).

We’re funny folk in Yorkshire, and we know it. We have some weird and wonderful sayings, such as “Put wood inth’ ole” (close the door) and “Allus say please n’ ta” (always say please and thank you) and many try to imitate us, watch this short clip. We’ve hundreds of odd words in Yorkshire but we do use normal ones like everyday folk, they just mean something different for us…

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What it means everywhere else: A profound, passionate, romantic affection for another person.

What it means in Yorkshire: A stranger whose name you don’t know.

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What it means everywhere else: Evening meal.

What it means in Yorkshire: Lunch.

Teayorkshire tea

What it means everywhere else: Hot drink brewed from tea leaves.

What it means in Yorkshire: Evening meal.

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What it means everywhere else: A person to avoid.

What it means in Yorkshire: A person to greet warmly and introduce yourself to.

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What it means everywhere else: People from privileged backgrounds, usually part of the upper classes.

What it means in Yorkshire: Anyone who pronounces their T’s.


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What it means everywhere else: A type of dancing in which an individual dances to music in a sexually provocative manner with thrusting hip movements.

What it means in Yorkshire: Where Yorkshire folk go Monday to Friday, 9–5pm.

 

 

We even sing “Ilkla Moor Baht ‘at” (a song about walking on high ground near the picturesque town of Ilkley without a hat on and catching your death). What a place, have a listen and sing along!

We really love our scran (food) and have some reet (right) local treats. Yorkshire pudding (not a dessert), Wensleydale cheese, Henderson’s Relish and pork pie with mushy peas and mint sauce are just a handful of our delicacies. Oh, and we even invented the flushing toilet too, bit of a myth but we’re claiming it.

Now people think Yorkshire folk are miserable and tight. Wrong. We’re officially rated as the happiest county in England and we’re warm and welcoming. In fact, we’d like to offer you some of our famous Yorkshire hospitality for free. Happen (perhaps) you could visit our factory and see. We’ll put t’ kettle on (make a cup of Yorkshire Tea) and lay out some snap (snacks). You’ll pay your own train fare though – we are tight Yorkshire folk after all.

If you can’t make it, no mither (bother). Lift a brew (cup of tea) to us on Yorkshire Day and give us a call +44 (0) 1977 705 600 or email sales@dakin-flathers.com. We can blether on (talk) about bandsaws and blades ‘til the cows come home (for a long, long time).

I’ll sithe (see you) soon.

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